Just Do Art: Week of Sept. 18, 2016

Anne de Carbuccia’s exhibition at Westbeth employs a centuries-old device to contemplate contemporary devastation. Photo courtesy the artist.

Anne de Carbuccia’s exhibition at Westbeth employs a centuries-old device to contemplate contemporary devastation. Photo courtesy the artist.

EXHIBITION: “ONE PLANET ONE FUTURE” | Born in New York City, raised in Paris, and educated at Columbia University (where she studied anthropology as well as 17th – and 18th-century art history), Anne de Carbuccia’s work in the mediums of photography and film reflect a big-picture, long-game perspective developed during her formal academic training, as well as during a series of global expeditions, during which she witnessed pollution, war, species on the brink of extinction, and primitive cultures on the verge of collapse. Her “One Planet” collection of images aren’t simply contemplations of natural beauty; there’s an undercurrent of anger at man’s propensity for inserting a disproportionate amount of death into the circle of life (hence the omnipresent skull imagery, which also references the genre of “vanitas” art).

Free. Through Nov. 21. Hours: Mon., Wed. & Thurs., 11:30am–6:30pm; Fri. & Sat., 12–8:30pm; Sun., 11:30am–6:30pm. At Westbeth Center for the Arts (155 Bank St., btw. West & Washington Sts.). Visit westbeth.org and annedecarbuccia.com.

 

Sept. 18, a walking tour led by historian Miriam Berman sheds light on the Flatiron Building and its namesake district. Photo courtesy Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

Sept. 18, a walking tour led by historian Miriam Berman sheds light on the Flatiron Building and its namesake district. Photo courtesy Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

FLATIRON BUILDING WALKING TOUR | It’s much more than the spitting image of a retired Monopoly piece, or a selfie waiting to happen. Discover little-known facts about the city’s most charismatic skyscraper — when the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership celebrates the 50th anniversary of the landmarking of the Flatiron Building, with a special version of their weekly walking tour. Guided by native New Yorker and historian Miriam Berman (author of “Madison Square: The Park and Its Celebrated Landmarks”), you’ll first circle around the iconic building, then tour the Flatiron district while learning how the 22-story, 1902-built structure influenced the evolution of a neighborhood.

Free; no advance registration required. Sun., Sept. 18. At 11am, meet at the southwest corner of Madison Square Park (23rd St. & Broadway, in front of the William Seward statue). Same time, day, place for weekly 90-minute walking tours. Visit flatirondistrict.nyc/free-walking-tour.

Sept. 24’s “Submerge” marine science event explores the big tent that is the Hudson River ecosystem. Photo courtesy HRPT.

Sept. 24’s “Submerge” marine science event explores the big tent that is the Hudson River ecosystem. Photo courtesy HRPT.

SUBMERGE NYC MARINE SCIENCE FESTIVAL | Immerse yourself in the lore of local marine life, during this all-day festival designed to raise awareness of our coastal waters. Hudson River Park’s Pier 26 is the site of multiple family-friendly programs and activities coordinated by the New York Hall of Science. Research stations and a science stage offer hands-on activities, presentations, experiments, and wildlife performances; a tour of Stony Brook University’s R/V Seawolf research vessel reveals how they conduct oceanographic sampling and sturgeon tagging; Pier 26’s Downtown Boathouse staff takes you through the history of kayaks, then puts you in one to paddle the Hudson River; scuba dive demos have frogmen (and frogwomen) plunging into the Hudson to collect river specimens; and surf/turf food truck options from the likes of Gorilla Cheese, Urban Lobster Shack and Yaki Taco ensure your energy level doesn’t ebb and flow like the tide.

Free. Sat., Sept. 24, 11am4pm at Pier 26 in Hudson River Park (at N. Moore St.). Visit hudsonriverpark.org/special-events/view/events-Submerge and nysci.org.

Dynamic stage presence Liz Callaway lends her voice to Sept. 24’s Concert of Hope, to benefit local homeless services organizations. Photo via lizcallaway.com.

Dynamic stage presence Liz Callaway lends her voice to Sept. 24’s Concert of Hope, to benefit local homeless services organizations. Photo via lizcallaway.com.

A CONCERT OF HOPE | Top-notch vocalists lend their names, time, and talent to this concert, 50% of whose proceeds will benefit NYC homeless services organizations. The roster of performers includes Grammy-nominated Metropolitan Opera veteran and mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade; Tony nominee, Emmy Award-winning actress, and go-to singer of Sondheim, Liz Callaway; tenor Daniel (the “Singing Cop”) Rodriguez, The Highland Divas, and the Sing The World Choir, combined from its American and Australian membership. The evening’s centerpiece, “Street Requiem,” is a contemporary choral work written “to reflect the multicultural and multi-faith traditions of modern city living” and meant to honor the memory of those who have died while living on the street.

Sat., Sept. 24, 8pm, at Carnegie Hall (881 Seventh Ave., btw. W. 56th & W. 57th Sts.). For more info, visit streetrequiem.teamapp.com. For tickets ($28$48), visit carnegiehall.org (student/senior discounts available at the box office). For info on organizations to benefit from ticket sales: aliforneycenter.org, holyapostlesoupkitchen.org, midnightrun.org, picturethehomeless.org, safehorizon.org, and westendres.org.

–BY SCOTT STIFFLER

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