Basketball pier was hopping with Art on Paper

 

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A “crystallized” book by Alexis Arnold at Art on Paper.  Photos by Lincoln Anderson

In its second edition, the Art on Paper fair returned to the Lower East Side’s Pier 36 at Montgomery St. last week. Normally, the pier is home to Basketball City, but for the four-day fair, from Thursday to Sunday, it was buzzing with gallerists and art lovers, more than 20,000 of them over the event’s duration. The fair featured the best in paper-based art — works on, about and from paper — from 65 top galleries from Downtown Manhattan to around the world. Among local artists featured were the late Larry Rivers and graffiti great LA II.

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Basketball City was temporarily transformed into an art city for Art on Paper.

 

 

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New works by LAII, in which he adds his signature squiggles and marks to Keith Haring pieces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Gynecologist listening to fetal heartbeat, Remedios,” by Ernesto Bazan (gelatin silver print, 1996), shows a scene in Cuba.

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A head made of cut-up books screwed to the canvas.

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The sails in this boat sculpture were a type of paper.

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Lower Eastside Girls Club members manned their display area at Art on Paper, clockwise from lower right, Allana Clarke, Erikka James, Milaelys Ramirez and Amarilis Jimenez.

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Catherine Haggerty, an artist from Jersey City, displayed one of her figurative abstract gouache-and-oil paintings.

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Nancy Hoffman of Nancy Hoffman Gallery on W. 27th St. in Chelsea, modeled a Pred-a-Porter, battery-operated vintage handbag by Michele Pred. The bags, which go for $1,200 each, are from the 1950s and ’60s and have all been customized with different messages about a woman’s right to choose. The phrases can be set to blink or to stay on constantly.

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Laurence Vallieres was “monkeying around,” creating this piece from cardboard and glue, without any structure underneath.

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The Lower Eastside Girls Club members, among other artwork they made, created these drawings with brief biographies for the victims of the Charleston church shooting.

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