What the great ones groove to, and why

© William Ellis Annie Ross, with Billie Holiday’s “Lady in Satin.”

© William Ellis
Annie Ross, with Billie Holiday’s “Lady in Satin.”

BY SCOTT STIFFLER  |  From Graham Nash beaming with pride at the “Sgt. Pepper’s” album to Al Jarreau giving Les Double Six a thumbs up, to Johnny Marr paying Iggy and the Stooges’ “Raw Power” some somber respect: The One LP Project reminds us that those we have on heavy rotation started out as humble, ravenous fans. Determined to provide “a compelling insight into how this music often sets out the course of their lives,” British photographer William Ellis spoke with 50 musicians about the deep connection they felt with a particular recording. This exhibit (the very first for its host venue) will have QR code links to the interviews, alongside its equally candid and revealing portraits. The opening night event, at which Ellis will take photos of those in attendance cradling their own favorite recording, is sold out. Another session has been added: Sat., Sept. 20, 2–4 p.m. The $100 fee benefits the ARChive of Contemporary Music — a noble non-profit music library and industry research center that knows how to throw a party (contact them to attend, or become a member and snag an invite to their impending Holiday Record + CD Sale opening night shingdig).

© William Ellis Ron Carter, with his copy of Leonard Bernstein & The NY Philharmonic’s recording of Dvorak’s “New World Symphony.”

© William Ellis
Ron Carter, with his copy of Leonard Bernstein & The NY Philharmonic’s recording of Dvorak’s “New World Symphony.”

“The One LP Project” is a free exhibit, at the ARChive of Contemporary Music (54 White St., 3 blocks south of Canal St., btw. Broadway & Church Sts.). Sept. 19–Oct. 3. Mon.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. For info, call 212-226-6967 or visit arcmusic.org. Also visit onelp.com.

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