Just Do Art, Week of Sept. 25, 2014

Duke is king, for Kenny Burrell.  © William Ellis

Duke is king, for Kenny Burrell. © William Ellis

THE ONE LP PROJECT  |  From Graham Nash beaming with pride at the “Sgt. Pepper’s” album to Al Jarreau giving Les Double Six a thumbs up, to Johnny Marr paying Iggy and the Stooges’ “Raw Power” some somber respect: The One LP Project reminds us that those we have on heavy rotation started out as humble, ravenous fans. Determined to provide “a compelling insight into how this music often sets out the course of their lives,” British photographer William Ellis spoke with 50 musicians about the deep connection they felt with a particular recording. This exhibit will have QR code links to the interviews, alongside its equally candid and revealing portraits. It’s the first such exhibit of this, or any, kind for the ARChive of Contemporary Music — a noble non-profit music library and industry research center that knows how to throw a party (contact them to attend, or become a member and snag an invite to their impending Holiday Record + CD Sale opening night shingdig).

“The One LP Project” is a free exhibit, at the ARChive of Contemporary Music (54 White St., 3 blocks south of Canal St., btw. Broadway & Church Sts.). Through Oct. 3. Daily, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. For info, call 212-226-6967 or visit arcmusic.org. Also visit onelp.com.

L-R: Christine Verleny as Joyce and Laurie Schroeder as Judy, in “Daughters of the Sexual Revolution.”   Photo by Gerry Goodstein

L-R: Christine Verleny as Joyce and Laurie Schroeder as Judy, in “Daughters of the Sexual Revolution.” Photo by Gerry Goodstein

DAUGHTERS OF THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION
It’s 1976 in suburban New York. While men fixate on the modern sensibilities of “that Bionic Man program” while praising the curative powers of Valium, women concern themselves with recreational pot and the impropriety of glorifying America’s Bicentennial. Meanwhile, a promising but unfocused college student is failing ethics, both in and outside of the classroom. Returning home from campus with a boyfriend in tow, her ruthless determination to go on The Pill forces her parents and the couple next door to confront several aspects of sexual liberation, and change course accordingly. Dana Leslie Goldstein’s new play has two generations asking, “Where does freedom end and responsibility begin?” It’s a question she isn’t concerned with answering definitively, but the script does take great pleasure in mulling over how the personal ethics of one person can both challenge and undercut the behavior of another.

Through Oct. 11. Thurs. at 7 p.m. Fri. & Sat. at 8 p.m. Sun. at 3 p.m. Added show Mon., Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. At WorkShop Theater (312 W. 36th St., 4th Fl.). For tickets ($18, $15 for students/seniors), call 866-811-4111 or visit workshoptheater.org.

Olivia Killingsworth and Quinlan Corbett, in the Metropolitan Playhouse production of “Icebound.”  Photo by Jeremy X. Halpern

Olivia Killingsworth and Quinlan Corbett, in the Metropolitan Playhouse production of “Icebound.” Photo by Jeremy X. Halpern

METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS “ICEBOUND”
Tirelessly devoted to presenting works from America’s theatrical heritage — and especially adept at choosing ones that are both revelatory and relevant — the East Village’s Metropolitan Playhouse opens their 23rd season (devoted to “Progress”) with “Icebound.” Seen only once on the New York stage since its 1923 premiere, this revival of Owen Davis’ Pulitzer Prize-winner for Drama marks only the second effort from the author, since choosing to abandon a string of highly lucrative westerns, sex comedies and melodramas in favor of more serious fare. Set in rural Maine (where Davis was born), “Icebound” concerns the chilly reception given to a shrewish second cousin who becomes heir to the estate of a stern matriarch. Denied any inheritance, the bitter children are also frozen out by the newly powerful cousin — who hires their on-the-lam black sheep brother to help around the house. They clash as well, but also envision a better future. “But nature will out,” warns Playhouse artistic director Alex Roe, in “a play that asks whether our habits and fears will always defy our highest aspirations.”

Sept. 26–Oct. 19. Thurs.–Sat. at 7:30 p.m. & Sun. at 3 p.m. (also Oct. 8, 11, 15 & 18 at 3 p.m.). At Metropolitan Playhouse (220 E. Fourth St., btw. Aves. A & B). For tickets ($25, $20 for students & seniors; $10 for those under 18), call 800-838-3006 or visit metropolitanplayhouse.org.tickets.

A house that may or may not be for sale isn’t the only thing up for grabs, in “Mr. Landing Takes A Fall.”  Photo by Erik Carter

A house that may or may not be for sale isn’t the only thing up for grabs, in “Mr. Landing Takes A Fall.” Photo by Erik Carter

MR. LANDING TAKES A FALL
Chimney smoke rises from that charming little house on the hill, beckoning a young, just-married couple to bypass their honeymoon and put down roots — but first, they must dislodge the husband and wife who’ve barricaded themselves inside for 500 years, passing the time with booze, button-pushing and occasional concern for birds who flock together but can’t pull off a decent migration. It seems like all the world’s in an ominous holding pattern at the onset of “Mr. Landing Takes A Fall” — Sari Caine’s absurd, melancholy and unexpectedly violent drawing room comedy that full-throttles its four players through an evening filled with revelations from both couples, during which they consider the relative merits of stoking or extinguishing the spark that first drew them to one another. Both options come with their share of hope and dread.

At 7 p.m. on Sept. 26, 27, 30 & Oct. 1–4 and at 3 p.m. on Sept. 28. At The Flea Theater (41 White St., btw. Church & Broadway). For tickets ($18), call 212-352-3101 or visit theflea.org. For artist info: slightlyaltered.org.

Gansevoort Plaza is the place for Tastes of NYC: Sun., Sept. 28.  Photo by Robert Ripps

Gansevoort Plaza is the place for Tastes of NYC: Sun., Sept. 28. Photo by Robert Ripps

TASTES OF NYC
It’s an afternoon of nibbling among the cobblestones, when chefs from some of the best restaurants in Chelsea, the Meatpacking District and the West Village converge on Gansevoort Plaza for the 7th Annual Tastes of NYC. All proceeds ensure the continuation of arts and enrichment programs at The Lab School for Collaborative Studies (on W. 17th St.). A village of white tents will showcase small-plate offerings from Bakehouse, Serafina, Corsino, Fatty Crab, Zampa, Giovanni Rana, Fig & Olive, Spasso, The Quarter, Grape & Vine, Mighty Quinn’s BBQ, Tia Pol, Doppio, Sweet Corner Bakeshop, Heartwood, Crave.it, 16 Handles, Philip Marie, and The Chester.

Raffle prizes include gift certificates and cookbooks. This Zero-Waste event aims to throw nothing away (even the servers’ gloves are made of compostable sugar cane!).

Sun., Sept. 28, 1–4 p.m. at Gansevoort Plaza (at Little W. 12th St. & 9th Ave.). A six-taste ticket is $40 in advance (via TastesNYC.org), $50 day of. A Community Table (ticket for one at a community table with food runner service) is $100, and a Donor Circle Table (one table for six with seating and food runners) is $750. More info on Facebook at NYC Lab School Tastes or Instagram at @nyclabtastes or on Twitter at NYC LabTastes.

Edward Morgan, whose troupe performs Oct. 3-5 to raise awareness about homelessness and benefit Goddard Riverside’s community service programs.   Photo courtesy of The Edward Morgan Ballet

Edward Morgan, whose troupe performs Oct. 3-5 to raise awareness about homelessness and benefit Goddard Riverside’s community service programs. Photo courtesy of The Edward Morgan Ballet

BALLET FOR THE HOMELESS
Founder Edward Morgan, director Joseph Alexander and ensemble members from TheEdwardMorganBallet NYC — in collaboration with singers, actors and street dancers — will perform several dance pieces designed to raise awareness and educate people about homelessness in New York City. In addition, the program includes “Earthly Love, Heavenly Spirits,” a pas de deux commemorating the death of Matthew Shepard (first danced in October 2001 and revived by the troupe in honor of, Mr. Morgan notes, “LGBT homeless youth who died on the streets, fighting to survive”). Proceeds will benefit Goddard Riverside, whose programs work to meet people’s basic food, shelter, and educational needs (the MorganBallet is their resident dance company).

Fri. & Sat., Oct. 3 & 4 at 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. At the Church of the Holy Apostles (296 Ninth Ave. at 28th St.). Free admission. Reserved seating, $50. For reservations & info, call 212-582-1941 or visit edwardmorganballet.org (from the Home page, click on “performances”).

—  BY SCOTT STIFFLER  

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